Beauty

From new product launches to inspiring campaigns, discover the trends impacting the beauty sector

Need to Know
19 : 05 : 20

Ellis Day’s bacteria-powered skincare, fashion designers call for a more sustainable calendar and Chinese consumers want more at-home dining options.

A serum to boost the skin’s microbiome

Wild Resilience Active Phage Serum by Ellis Day Skin Science, US Wild Resilience Active Phage Serum by Ellis Day Skin Science, US
Wild Resilience Active Phage Serum by Ellis Day Skin Science, US Wild Resilience Active Phage Serum by Ellis Day Skin Science, US
Wild Resilience Active Phage Serum by Ellis Day Skin Science, US Wild Resilience Active Phage Serum by Ellis Day Skin Science, US

US – Ellis Day Skin Science is a skincare brand harnessing the power of microorganisms with its debut product.

The Wild Resilience Active Phage Serum draws on the use of phages: foundational microorganisms that balance bacteria. The brand blends bioactive ingredients that reset and regenerate the skin's microbiome, while supporting bacteria that reduces inflammation, redness and blemishes.

‘This is a brand new active ingredient that’s completely natural. It belongs on your skin,’ says Carol Christopher, CEO of Ellis Day. ‘In a perfect world, you would have all the right phages on your skin to kill all the bad bacteria on it, and you would have a perfectly balanced microbiome. In an imperfect world, we are just helping you do that.’

As we explore in our upcoming Beauty macrotrend, consumers will be increasingly conscious of the ingredients they’re putting on their skin – and investing in products that prioritise health and safety.

Covid-19: Nike recognises healthcare professionals as athletes

Nike Air Zoom Pulse by Nike in collaboration with Good360, US Nike Air Zoom Pulse by Nike in collaboration with Good360, US
Nike Air Zoom Pulse by Nike in collaboration with Good360, US Nike Air Zoom Pulse by Nike in collaboration with Good360, US

Global – Nike has teamed up with US non-profit Good360 to donate footwear, apparel and equipment to healthcare professionals.

Launched in support of frontline healthcare workers fighting Covid-19, the initiative recognises healthcare professionals as athletes. In particular, 30,000 pairs of Nike's Air Zoom Pulse shoe, which was initially unveiled in November 2019, are being donated because of its suitability for extensive shift work.

‘The Nike Air Zoom Pulse is our first shoe designed for the healthcare athlete, an everyday hero,’ says the brand in a press release. The donation efforts also come after the brand recently created and distributed full-face shields and powered, air purifying respirator lenses to protect healthcare workers amid the pandemic.

During the current Covid-19 pandemic, brands are assuming an increasingly civic role, stepping up with community initiatives and response efforts around the world.

Fashion’s petition for a seasonless future

Global – An open letter to the fashion industry has been released by a group of influential designers and retail executives to call for a more manageable fashion calendar.

Prompted by a Zoom call featuring designer Dries van Noten, the chief executive at Lane Crawford, Andrew Keith, and chief executive of Altuzarra, Shira Sue Carmi, the discussion centred around the fashion systems currently in place. The group proposed adjusted seasonality and flow of both menswear and womenswear, with actions including putting the Autumn/Winter season back in winter and Spring/Summer season back in summer.

‘This is a super challenging time but let’s not let this crisis go to waste,’ said Carmi. ‘It’s not normal to buy winter clothes in May,’ van Noten added. ‘It’s not normal to work with the design team on a collection that hits the shop floor one month and a half before it’s discounted at 50 per cent.’

With Covid-19 having presented both challenges and opportunities for the fashion industry, designers are already beginning to embrace ideas such as digital fashion weeks

.

Altuzarra Spring Summer 2020, Paris Altuzarra Spring Summer 2020, Paris

Stat: Asian consumers embrace eating at home

Our Place Our Place

According to a study by Nielsen, Asian consumers are reconsidering their eating habits as a result of Covid-19.

The study reveals that 86% of Chinese consumers plan to eat at home more often than before the outbreak. Similarly, 77% of consumers in Hong Kong said they were planning to eat at home more often than before Covid-19, while in South Korea, Malaysia and Vietnam, the figure was 62%.

‘The Covid-19 epidemic is quickly revolutionising how consumers from mainland China think about their health, as well as changing their purchasing behaviour and the channels they are using to shop,’ explains Justin Sargent, president of Nielsen China.

While many restaurants and bars have been hit hard by the global pandemic, the evolution of delivery formats presents a growing opportunity. For more, read our Asian Virtual Kitchens Market.

You have 3 free News articles remaining. Sign up to one of our membership packages from just £100 a month.
View Subscription Offers Sign in

What do we use cookies for?

We use cookies to enable the use of our platform’s paid features and to analyse our traffic. No personal data, including your IP address, is stored and we do not sell data to third parties.

Learn more