Need to Know
22 : 06 : 18

22.06.2018 Fashion : Beauty : Technology

Kloters aims to reduce pollution with smart clothing, Moon Juice revives skin with mushrooms, Reebok podcast celebrates women’s streetwear community.

1. A smart t-shirt that captures polluted air

RepAir by Kloters

Italy – Developed by Italian clothing brand Kloters, RepAir is a new t-shirt that absorbs pollution in an effort to clean the surrounding air.

Embedded in the pocket of the t-shirt is an insert made of The Breath, a patented material that is usually integrated into buildings and vehicles to reduce pollution. The material is made of three layers. As the air flows into the pocket, the two outer layers act as a filter, separating the bad pollutants such as ozone, PAH and benzene from the healthy air molecules. The inner layer further prevents the poor air from being released.

Kloters highlights how innovative garment design could provide solutions to reverse the damage of air pollution. At a recent design workshop, local artists developed a pair of trainers that filter air through the soles of the shoe, to capture toxins and expel purified air.

2. Moon Juice unveils skincare line made from mushrooms

Beauty Shroom by Moon Juice Beauty Shroom by Moon Juice
Beauty Shroom by Moon Juice Beauty Shroom by Moon Juice
Beauty Shroom by Moon Juice Beauty Shroom by Moon Juice

California – Adaptogenic beauty brand Moon Juice has launched its first skincare line, which harnesses the benefits of mushrooms.

Exploring the restorative properties of silver ear mushrooms, the line comprises three products – a jelly serum, collagen protection supplement and an exfoliating acid potion – designed to smooth, plump and hydrate the skin. ‘[Mushrooms] have been used for thousands of years for everything from energy and focus to immunity and beauty. Their potential is limitless, both used as supplements or topically on the skin,’ Amanda Chantal Bacon, founder of Moon Juice, tells Well + Good.

It is now recognised that food not only affects your internal health, but also the health of your skin, so beauty brands are looking to the food aisle to incorporate healthy ingredients into the formulas of their skincare products.

3. Instagram launches an independent video platform

Global – The photo-sharing app is expanding its services with the launch of Instagram TV, a new platform dedicated to extended video content.

The new app, IGTV, will enable users to upload and view video clips of up to one hour long. Unlike existing platforms such as YouTube and Vimeo, IGTV is built for mobile viewing only, where all video content is vertical and full screen. The platform is accessible from a TV button inside Instagram or can be reached through a stand-alone app.

The new app provides a space for brands to reach new audiences and connect to communities of like-minded individuals through curated video. Look out for the launch of The Future Laboratory on IGTV.

IGTV, Instagram IGTV, Instagram

4. Reebok launches a female-driven streetwear podcast

Flipping The Game, Reebok

Global – Footwear brand Reebok is celebrating the female streetwear and sneakerhead scene with the launch of a new podcast, Flipping the Game.

While streetwear has traditionally been an alienating market for young women, the brand hopes to promote a more inclusive environment by exploring the relationship between women and the trainer industry. The podcast will celebrate the women who designed Reebok's original 1980s women’s sneaker, the Freestyle, as well as the influencers who empowered and inspired other women in the streetwear scene.

‘Gone should be the days of ‘now available in women’s sizes’,’ says Scottie Beam, Flipping the Game host. ‘Women love sneakers, and sneakers are for women just as much as men, simple as that. Our goal is to honestly just remind everyone of this and flex on the patriarchy while we’re at it.’

For more on the changing narrative of streetwear, see our Women’s Streetwear Market.

5. The City of London to be powered by green energy

As part of a new environmental strategy, which aims to make London zero-carbon by 2050, the city’s historic Square Mile will convert to clean energy, sourcing 100% of its electricity from renewable sources. The plans include the installation of more solar panels on City Corporation buildings and investments in installations such as wind and solar farms.

The switch follows recent announcements from a number of technology corporations that are committing to renewable energy, including Facebook, Microsoft and more recently, Samsung and Apple. Look out for our forthcoming market on green energy to discover more on how companies are planning for better cities of the future.

6. Thought-starter: Is the future of corner shops socially conscious retail?

We spoke to Rachel Krupa, founder of Los Angeles retailer The Goods Mart, about creating a socially conscious convenience store that is driving positive change at community level.

‘As consumers, we’re more educated about ingredients and demand better options, so we tend to order products online or wait to shop in a better grocery store. No one thinks to pop in to their neighbourhood convenience store for mindfully sourced, well-crafted food and home products’, says Krupa.

The Goods Mart aims to change what a convenience store can be with its curation of locally sourced and organic products. ‘We have no artificial colours, artificial flavours, artificial sweeteners, growth hormones or harmful pesticides in any of the products we sell. Our animal proteins are humanely raised and free of nitrates and antibiotics, and none are GMO,’ Krupa explains. ‘Better packaging is also paramount, so we are doing our best to reduce the use of plastic in-store, offering BPA-free only.’

Ultimately, the core value of The Goods Mart is to do good, she says. ‘If we all do it, we make a bigger impact.’

Read the full interview here.

The Goods Mart, US The Goods Mart, US