Wild things

02 : 10 : 2015 Marshmallow Lazer Feast : Virtual Reality : Installation

UK – Visitors to the Lake District were invited to see the land through the eyes of its wildlife in Marshmallow Lazer Feast’s latest installation.

  • Commissioned for Abandon Normal Devices and Forestry Commission England’s Forest Art Works
  • ‘We wanted to give people a chance to reflect on their own visual perception of the forest’ – Marshmallow Lazer Feast
In the Eyes of the Animal by Marshmallow Laser Feast commissioned for Abandon Normal Devices and Forest Art Works, UK. Photography by Luca Marziale In the Eyes of the Animal by Marshmallow Laser Feast commissioned for Abandon Normal Devices and Forest Art Works, UK. Photography by Luca Marziale
In the Eyes of the Animal by Marshmallow Laser Feast commissioned for Abandon Normal Devices and Forest Art Works, UK. Photography by Luca Marziale In the Eyes of the Animal by Marshmallow Laser Feast commissioned for Abandon Normal Devices and Forest Art Works, UK. Photography by Luca Marziale
In the Eyes of the Animal by Marshmallow Laser Feast commissioned for Abandon Normal Devices and Forest Art Works, UK. Photography by Luca Marziale In the Eyes of the Animal by Marshmallow Laser Feast commissioned for Abandon Normal Devices and Forest Art Works, UK. Photography by Luca Marziale
In the Eyes of the Animal by Marshmallow Laser Feast commissioned for Abandon Normal Devices and Forest Art Works, UK. Photography by Luca Marziale In the Eyes of the Animal by Marshmallow Laser Feast commissioned for Abandon Normal Devices and Forest Art Works, UK. Photography by Luca Marziale
In the Eyes of the Animal by Marshmallow Laser Feast commissioned for Abandon Normal Devices and Forest Art Works, UK. Photography by Luca Marziale In the Eyes of the Animal by Marshmallow Laser Feast commissioned for Abandon Normal Devices and Forest Art Works, UK. Photography by Luca Marziale

In the Eyes of the Animal was created to show Grizedale Forest from the unique perspective of its mammals, birds and insects through a digitised landscape based on the physical world.

Aerial 360-degree drone footage and computed tomography (CT) and light and radar (LIDAR) scanning were used to create a virtual environment that could hone in on microscopic details imperceptible to humans but easily detected by animals.

To aid further immersion, 360-degree recorded sound and a SubPac audio device enabled visitors to feel vibrations in their bones and muscles.

‘The ultimate goal was to create an understanding of how these animals process optical information to give people a chance to reflect on their own visual perception of the forest,’ said its creators.

The Big Picture: Technology is helping people get closer to the natural world as they become more conscious of the impact of consumerism. For more on how brands are reacting to this Anthropocene mindset, read our Whole-system Thinking macrotrend.

You have 2 free News articles remaining. Sign up to LS:N Global to get unlimited access to all articles.
Discover Our Memberships Sign in

What do we use cookies for?

We use cookies to enable the use of our platform’s paid features and to analyse our traffic. No personal data, including your IP address, is stored and we do not sell data to third parties.

Learn more