Constructing Connectivity by Jessica Smarsch at Dutch Design Week 2015, Eindhoven. Photography by Lisa Klappe. Constructing Connectivity by Jessica Smarsch at Dutch Design Week 2015, Eindhoven. Photography by Lisa Klappe.
Constructing Connectivity by Jessica Smarsch at Dutch Design Week 2015, Eindhoven. Photography by Lisa Klappe. Constructing Connectivity by Jessica Smarsch at Dutch Design Week 2015, Eindhoven. Photography by Lisa Klappe.
Constructing Connectivity by Jessica Smarsch at Dutch Design Week 2015, Eindhoven. Photography by Lisa Klappe. Constructing Connectivity by Jessica Smarsch at Dutch Design Week 2015, Eindhoven. Photography by Lisa Klappe.
Constructing Connectivity by Jessica Smarsch at Dutch Design Week 2015, Eindhoven. Photography by Lisa Klappe. Constructing Connectivity by Jessica Smarsch at Dutch Design Week 2015, Eindhoven. Photography by Lisa Klappe.
Constructing Connectivity by Jessica Smarsch at Dutch Design Week 2015, Eindhoven. Photography by Lisa Klappe. Constructing Connectivity by Jessica Smarsch at Dutch Design Week 2015, Eindhoven. Photography by Lisa Klappe.

Dutch Design Week 2015: Fashion in motion

29 : 10 : 2015 Dutch Design Week 2015 : Jessica Smarsch : Constructing Connectivity

Eindhoven – Jessica Smarsch presented 'Constructing Connectivity', a garment-making process that translated bodily movements into design blueprints.

  • Smarsch’s wearable device tracked the electricity generated by a dancer’s muscle movements. 
  • Custom visualisation software used the data to create a bespoke pattern

‘Traditionally, textiles were created through the natural rhythms of the body on a loom,’ Smarsch tells LS:N Global. ‘I wanted to bring the engagement of the body back into what is now a very industrial manufacturing process.’ 

Her wearable device tracked a dancer’s body through a series of movements. This data was then recoded and visualised using bespoke software to create a ‘monochrome graphic that becomes a blueprint for weaving fabric’. The pattern was then put through a loom using a double-layer weaving process and a plant and animal fibre to achieve a unique texture and form. 

A washing process then converted the fabric into a single, seamless garment, ready to be cut and worn. Each piece represents an individualised interpretation of choreography, movement and gesture.

The Big Picture

In the age of Whole-system Thinking, pioneering designers are challenging the repetitive production cycles of fast fashion by creating methods of sustainable manufacturing.

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