Need to Know
08 : 05 : 18

08.05.2018 Fashion : Food : Drinks

Streetwear Maple’s meme-filled campaign, Foster + Partners envisions a cargo-carrying hyperloop system, Eden Mill pioneers whisky innovation.

1. Maple embraces meme culture in its latest campaign

Maple SS18 campaign with Poundlandbandit, photography by J.M. Stasiuk, Canada Maple SS18 campaign with Poundlandbandit, photography by J.M. Stasiuk, Canada
Maple SS18 campaign with Poundlandbandit, photography by J.M. Stasiuk, Canada Maple SS18 campaign with Poundlandbandit, photography by J.M. Stasiuk, Canada
Maple SS18 campaign with Poundlandbandit, photography by J.M. Stasiuk, Canada Maple SS18 campaign with Poundlandbandit, photography by J.M. Stasiuk, Canada
Maple SS18 campaign with Poundlandbandit, photography by J.M. Stasiuk, Canada Maple SS18 campaign with Poundlandbandit, photography by J.M. Stasiuk, Canada

Canada – The streetwear accessory brand has enlisted Poundlandbandit, an anonymous meme creator, for its spring/summer 2018 campaign.

The campaign imagery showcases Maple’s bandanas, headwear and sterling silver jewellery alongside the influencer's infamous ‘starter packs’, a collection of items and characteristics that mimic certain stereotypes in today’s youth.

The campaign takes on a playful tone, poking fun at the absurdities of youth culture in an effort to connect to young digital consumers on a more personal level. As noted in our Global Luxury Market, other brands including Gucci and Fendi have adopted a similar approach by also tapping into internet culture.

2. Foster + Partners imagines a hyperloop delivery service

Video for DP World Cargospeed by Foster + Partners

Dubai – The architecture studio has premiered a video which visualises the concept of a high-speed transportation network that carries cargo.

DP World Cargospeed, a collaboration of DP World and Virgin Hyperloop One, aims to create a new autonomous system that will enable cargo to be rapidly transported around cities. The system is made up of pods that travel around an infrastructural network at speeds of up to 700 miles per hour. ‘The movement of people and goods is part of the vital infrastructure that binds all our cities together – and cities are the future of our society,’ says Norman Foster, founder of Foster + Partners.

Fuelled by the growth of on-demand culture,services are expected to move fast but Foster + Partners notes that hyperloop offers a more sustainable solution since it does not have direct carbon emissions.

For more innovations and ideas that will shape the future of the urban environment, follow our Smart Cities far futures series.

3. China is monitoring worker’s brains using data-collecting hats

China – The government-backed project conceals sensors in the helmets and hats of production workers, in order to monitor their emotional state.

The device observes brainwave activity and streams the live data directly to computers, which use artificial intelligence to detect emotional abnormalities. The method is designed to identify any high spikes in brain activity which may indicate conditions such as depression or anxiety. By improving understanding and communication between workers and employers, companies can work to reduce stress and as a result increase employee productivity.

See our Brand Culture 2020 report for more on how technology can transform the workplace.

My First Me by Masahiko Sato for Issey Miyake, Milan Salone Internazionale del Mobile 2018 My First Me by Masahiko Sato for Issey Miyake, Milan Salone Internazionale del Mobile 2018

4. Eden Mill experiment with whisky maturation techniques

Hip Flask Series, Eden Mill Whisky, Scotland, UK Hip Flask Series, Eden Mill Whisky, Scotland, UK

Scotland – Local distillery, Eden Mill has announced the public release of the first Single Malt Whisky distilled in St Andrews, in 160 years.

The brand is celebrating the historic milestone by offering customers the chance to purchase the whisky in a limited-edition Hip Flask range. As the new collection has been matured in ‘honey casks’ which hold a smaller amount of liquid, Eden Mill decided to release the extracts in smaller bottles. The series includes seven single malt whisky expressions. For instance, No1 was matured in French Virgin Octave, and offers a cinnamon spice taste and a hint of citrus.

‘The Hip Flask Series is about applying the pioneering and experimental nature synonymous with Eden Mill to single malt whisky, showing the power of trying different grains, processes, maturation techniques and woods to highlight what you can do differently within the realm of single malt Scotch whisky’, explains Paul Miller, co-founder of Eden Mill.

As a new generation of whisky drinkers comes to the fore, whisky brands, especially those of the Scotch variety need to consider how to be more accessible to this consumer, whilst still celebrating tradition.

5. Consumers miss sustainable logos on food packaging

A new study, conducted by researchers at Clemson’s university, found that 40% of shoppers were interested in sustainability initiatives. Despite this, many failed to notice the labels which in fact rated the product’s sustainability.

The purpose of the research was to identify whether a consumer is influenced by a visual sustainability rating system, placed on the front of a product’s packaging. To measure this, researchers attached a mobile eye-tracking system to the participants head, that showed where their attention was drawn to when shopping.

As consumers become increasingly interested in the true source and environmental impact of products, brands are demonstrating transparency through a number of logos and symbols including vegan, vegetarian, organic, gluten free. The crowded packaging can often be often mean that some labels go unnoticed, so brands may need to focus on more education around their certifications.

6. Thought-starter: Why is everyone talking about Japanese beauty?

Japanese beauty has long been overshadowed by the success of its Korean counterpart, but a fusing of pared-back routines and age-old traditionalism is seeing it reassert its position on the beauty map.

‘Japanese beauty is about a minimalist philosophy in terms of steps and ingredients. It’s about achieving the best results with the least – removing unnecessary ingredients and keeping only what is essential.’ says Giselle Go, co-founder of Japanese beauty brand DAM DAM

Where Korean beauty is known for its multi-step regimes and high-maintenance approach, Japanese beauty centers on more simplified and ritualistic routines. Warew is a recent example of this, and is a Japanese brand that wants to enter the European beauty market with its three-step routine.

Japanese beauty products spend a much longer time in R&D, with most products rooted in intense research. Nissha is one brand championing this and recently unveiled Shot Mode, a dissolving needle patch that can deliver serum to the skin transdermally.

For more on how Japanese beauty brands are advancing, read the full report here.

WASO by Shiseido and Wieden + Kennedy, Japan. Photography by Viviane Sassen WASO by Shiseido and Wieden + Kennedy, Japan. Photography by Viviane Sassen