Smart art

05 : 05 : 2016 Jonas Lund : Digital Art : Milan

Milan – Artist Jonas Lund’s latest work uses artificial intelligence (AI) to generate commercially optimised imagery.

  • The Swedish designer showed the new work at the Steve Turner gallery booth during Milan’s MiArt fair
  • The digital works can be transformed over time, depending on how commercial the artist wants them to be
 Installation view of Jonas Lund at Steve Turner, MiArt Milan. Photography courtesy of the artist and Steve Turner, Los Angeles Installation view of Jonas Lund at Steve Turner, MiArt Milan. Photography courtesy of the artist and Steve Turner, Los Angeles
Growth 1 2016 by Jonas Lund at Steve Turner, MiArt Milan. Photography courtesy of the artist and Steve Turner, Los Angeles Growth 1 2016 by Jonas Lund at Steve Turner, MiArt Milan. Photography courtesy of the artist and Steve Turner, Los Angeles
Hype Cycle 2016 by Jonas Lund at Steve Turner, MiArt Milan. Photography courtesy of the artist and Steve Turner, Los Angeles Hype Cycle 2016 by Jonas Lund at Steve Turner, MiArt Milan. Photography courtesy of the artist and Steve Turner, Los Angeles
Hype Cycle 2016 by Jonas Lund at Steve Turner, MiArt Milan. Photography courtesy of the artist and Steve Turner, Los Angeles Hype Cycle 2016 by Jonas Lund at Steve Turner, MiArt Milan. Photography courtesy of the artist and Steve Turner, Los Angeles

Artificial neutral networks (ANN) are used in computing to mimic the cognitive capabilities of the brain. For his latest artwork, New Now, Jonas Lund has created a triptych of digital paintings that can be transformed to become more commercial, conceptual or decorative, depending on input.

Lund trained an ANN to ‘paint’ by using 222 of his previous artworks, which he scanned in high resolution with added data about the price they commanded, speed of sale and other commercial variables. This enabled the ANN to generate an optimised artwork based on data points, and poses a question about what makes good art.

The New Now triptych is more of a conceptual piece than a practical answer to this question, however, as Lund only used 222 images compared to Google’s Deep Dream AI database of 14m, but it is still a striking example of how technology is influencing our creative industries.

​ The Big Picture

Artists and designers are increasingly turning to data in their work. For another example of the impact of AI on human creativity, see our Big Idea interview with M&C Saatchi’s chief innovation officer Dave Cox on its smart billboards.

You have 2 free News articles remaining. Sign up to one of our membership packages from just £100 a month.
View Subscription Offers Sign in

What do we use cookies for?

We use cookies to enable the use of our platform’s paid features and to analyse our traffic. No personal data, including your IP address, is stored and we do not sell data to third parties.

Learn more