Preview: Made in China

12 : 12 : 2016 ​Third Culture Kids : Made In China : Mindset

Global – Young Chinese people raised in a culture other than that of their parents are re-assessing their roots.

  • By 2020, Chinese consumption is predicted to grow by £1.8 trillion ($2.3 trillion, €2.1 trillion), according to Boston Consulting Group and AliResearch Institute
  • Some 61.9% of Chinese Generation D members no longer believe that financial accomplishment is the main signifier of success, according to RTG Consulting
Banana Magazine, New York Banana Magazine, New York
Sinofuturism by Lawrence Lek, London Sinofuturism by Lawrence Lek, London
Yat Pit collection. Photography Ren Hang Yat Pit collection. Photography Ren Hang
Banana Magazine, New York Banana Magazine, New York

Unlike past second-generation youngsters who have simply inherited social and cultural traits based on the location in which they were brought up alongside the family they were raised with, kids in this generation feel like they are part of a global community.

As digital natives, they live hyperconnected and borderless lives and construct their identity by absorbing global fashion, food, music and culture trends, staying in touch with a disparate networks of friends.

Increasingly, they are re-assessing what their cultural heritage means to them. Banana magazine, founded in New York, aims to explore what it means to be Asian – physically, culturally and sociologically – in the 21st century. ‘Whether it is rediscovering your grandma’s herbal soup recipes, exploring current Asian beauty culture through an editorial or commissioning original artwork to represent the dichotomy that can exist between two cultures, our content aims to cover all things AZN,’ say the editors.

The Big Picture

For more on how Chinese third-culture kids are re-assessing their cultural identity, read our Made In China microtrend.