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Need to know 02 : 08 : 17

02.08.2017 Travel : Retail : Wellness

In today’s daily digest: Delta Air Lines, Nixie Girl, Rushden Lakes, how sugary food affects mental health and other top stories.

1. Delta Air Lines wants to remind people of home

Delta Airport Codes by Wieden & Kennedy, New York Airport Codes by Wieden & Kennedy for Delta, New York
Delta Airport Codes by Wieden & Kennedy, New York Airport Codes by Wieden & Kennedy for Delta, New York
Airport Codes by Wieden & Kennedy for Delta, New York Airport Codes by Wieden & Kennedy for Delta, New York

New York – The airline has installed a playful mural in Williamsburg, Brooklyn, which features the airport codes of the 133 US cities that people can fly to from New York with Delta. Created by artist Celyn Brazier, each illustration contains symbols that reference aspects of the city they represent. Philadelphia’s code features a cartoon cheesesteak sandwich and Liberty Bell.

In addition to publicising the cities covered by Delta, the mural serves to highlight the social and cultural importance of second- and third-tier cities in the US. As explored in our macrotrend The American Middle, brands must do more to re-engage disenfranchised consumers who feel left behind in an uncertain political and economic climate.

2. Nixie Girl makes menstrual cups less daunting

Nixie Girl by Ailsa Inglis Nixie Girl by Ailsa Inglis
Nixie Girl by Ailsa Inglis Nixie Girl by Ailsa Inglis
Nixie Girl by Ailsa Inglis Nixie Girl by Ailsa Inglis

UK – Northumbria University graduate Ailsa Inglis has redesigned the menstrual cup to better appeal to young girls by making it easier to use. Acknowledging that women often avoid alternative period products because they find them intimidating, Inglis has adapted the design of her Nixie Girl to better indicate where users should press to insert it, as well as adding a silicone string to assist with removal and elongating the back lip to provide extra support against the cervix.

At present, 93% of women who menstruate use mainstream sanitary products, but as people become more aware of their enormous environmental impact, brands are beginning to take a more environmentally friendly approach and helping to destigmatise the feminine hygiene industry. For more, see our microtrend The Vagina Reconsidered.

3. Rushden Lakes combines retail and nature

Northamptonshire – The Rushden Lakes shopping centre aims to elevate the profile of the local area with its mix of stores, restaurants and outdoor activities. In addition to a selection of stores from big-name brands, the location features designated cycling routes and walking trails in the nearby Nene Wetlands, while a canoe-hire service enables visitors to explore the nearby lake.

As the cost of consumer goods rises in the UK and e-commerce mega-systems force smaller retailers out of the market, bricks-and-mortar locations are rethinking their strategy to offer consumers experiences that cannot be replicated online. For more, see our Destination Retail market.

Rushden Lakes by The Crown Estate, Northampton Rushden Lakes by The Crown Estate, Northamptonshire

4. Sephora Studio offers one-to-one consultations

Sephora Studio, Boston Sephora Studio, Boston
Sephora Studio, Boston Sephora Studio, Boston
Sephora Studio, Boston Sephora Studio, Boston

Boston – Sephora is expanding its service offer with its newly opened concept store, which provides customers with a range of one-to-one appointments. Clients who book a full makeover, mini-facial or mini-makeover receive a personalised skin consultation, in which expert artists use tools such as the Moisture Meter and Skincare IQ Quiz to determine each person’s optimum skincare regime.

While consumers are increasingly interested in personalised services, for the majority, human interaction continues to remain a priority. As explored in our Future of Service report, future-facing brands such as Sephora are combining digital technology with human expertise to better meet the service needs of their customers.

5. High sugar intake can cause anxiety in men

A study of 5,000 men and 2,000 women conducted over a 22-year period by University College London suggests that men with a high sugar intake are more at risk of developing mental disorders such as anxiety or depression. As consumers increasingly look to science to help them make informed food choices, brands need to be aware of the effects of certain ingredients on their mental as well as physical wellbeing. Read our Upstream Eating microtrend and interview with neuroscientist Dr Tara Swart to find out more.

6. Thought-starter: Why is being transgender still an issue?

In the wake of President Trump’s inflammatory comments about transgender people, LS:N Global senior journalist Maks Fus Mickiewicz asks what is at the root of hate speech.

Although people may feel disgust or confusion in response to two men kissing or a person who has decided to change gender, for many it is because they have been brought up in a way that teaches them this is not the norm.

People are also lazy. Given the choice, they would rather stick to their inherent bias than try to understand other human beings or empathise with them.

It is brands’ responsibility to educate consumers otherwise. It is no longer enough to sit on the fence, let alone allow inherent bias. It is time to break away from dangerous stereotypes that tell your audiences they are not part of your vision.

To find out how brands need to re-assess their attitude to gender and identity, read the full opinion piece here.

The Gaze from & Other Stories, Stockholm The Gaze from & Other Stories, Stockholm