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Why the psychology of eating is visual

10 : 05 : 2017 Food & Drink : Hospitality : Art And Design

The Netherlands – Artist Marije Vogelzang explores how the amount on our plate affects feelings of fullness.

Volumes by Marije Vogelzang, The Netherlands Volumes by Marije Vogelzang, The Netherlands
Volumes by Marije Vogelzang, The Netherlands Volumes by Marije Vogelzang, The Netherlands
Volumes by Marije Vogelzang, The Netherlands Volumes by Marije Vogelzang, The Netherlands
Volumes by Marije Vogelzang, The Netherlands Volumes by Marije Vogelzang, The Netherlands

Her series, Volumes, comprises a collection of stones wrapped in heat-resistant silicone to resemble organic, almost organ-like, shapes, which are placed on plates alongside food to alter diners’ perception of food volume.

The project, which has been informed by behavioural research showing that the amount of food we eat is influenced by what we see, demonstrates a creative approach to tackling the global obesity epidemic.

By adding volume and weight to diners’ plates, Vogelzang hopes to ‘change our mindless consumption behaviour into a mindful experience’ by creating the illusion of a fuller meal. ‘Most of us seem to rely on the size – the volume – of the food to tell us when we’re full,’ she says. ‘We usually try to eat the same visible amount of food we’re used to eating.’

The Big Picture

  • Artists and designers such as Marije Vogelzang and Jouw are exploring new ways to encourage more mindful consumption
  • To find out more about how Vogelzang is challenging assumptions around eating, see our Talent piece